Influenza Vaccine Information

The best protection from influenza is an influenza vaccination. To help you and your family stay healthy, we are offering influenza vaccine to people 6 months and older. To make an appointment, call the clinic location near you or schedule an appointment through the patient portal. Patients can also request an influenza vaccine during an appointment with their primary health care provider.
 
You may call a number below to schedule an appointment to get a vaccination:

  • Arcadia: 895 S. Dettloff Dr., 608-323-3373
  • Caledonia: 701 N. Sprague St., 507-724-3353
  • Holmen: 1303 Main St. S., 608-526-3351
  • La Crescent: 524 N. Elm St., 507-895-6600
  • La Crosse: Professional Arts Building, 615 10th St. S., first floor, Regula Conference Room (ages 3 and up), 608-392-9633; or Pediatric & Adolescent Medicine, 800 West Ave. S., 608-392-9881
  • Onalaska: 191 Theater Rd., 608-392-5001
  • Prairie du Chien: 800 E. Blackhawk Ave., 608-326-0808
  • Sparta: 310 W. Main St., 608-269-1770
  • Tomah: 325 Butts Ave., 608-371-5951
  • Waukon: 105 E. Main St., 563-568-3449 or 1-800-707-2045 (toll-free)

On the go?

If you prefer to walk in to receive an influenza vaccination, it is available during regular clinic hours for those age 3 and up at:

La Crosse: Professional Arts Building, 615 10th St. S., first floor, Regula Conference Room

  • Oct. 15-Nov. 21
  • Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Thursdays
  • 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Did you know?

The cost of seasonal influenza vaccine is covered by some insurance plans. Mayo Clinic Health System will bill insurance or accept payment.
Children 6 months through 8 years need two flu vaccines if it’s the child’s first seasonal flu vaccination. The second vaccine is given at least four weeks from the date of the first.

People at high risk of developing serious complications from influenza include:

  • Those with chronic medical conditions, such as asthma, diabetes and lung disease
  • Pregnant women
  • People 65 or older
  • People who live with or care for others at high risk of developing serious complications, including caregivers of young children and people with chronic medical conditions

Viruses in the influenza vaccine are inactive, so you cannot get influenza from the vaccine. After getting vaccinated, it takes about two weeks to develop antibodies to protect against influenza. That’s why getting vaccinated early in the fall is recommended. If you are sick, stay home from work or school to prevent spreading illness to others.